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Self induced vomiting and Dental Diseases

Abstract: Yes, self-induced vomiting can destroy the teeth enamel och damage the teeth.

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Self induced vomiting and Dental Diseases

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Question(s): 
Written by: Fabio Piccini, doctor and Jungian psychotherapist, in charge of the "Centre for Eating Disorders Therapy" at "Malatesta Novello" nursing home in Cesena. Works privately in Rimini and Chiavari. E-mail:

First version: 22 Jul 2008.
Latest revision: 21 Dec 2008.

Is it true that vomiting in the long term can ruin the dental enamel? Should I prevent vomiting?

Answer:

Yes, it's true. Self-induced vomiting can cause erosions of the dental enamel, the teeth can become chipped and corroded and this can increase the frequency of dental decays. Also, the salivary glands can become much bigger, and this swelling can bring on inflammations and infections.

The psychological and physical consequences of such a practice can also be much more serious, since vomiting can cause cardiac arrhythmias.

Besides, it's important to understand that vomiting is only a way to add problems to problems instead of a method to solve them.

If vomiting is a part of your emotional problems, you'd better see a dental specialist and ask him for suggestions to protect your teeth, in the meanwhile, try to solve your main physical or psychological problems.

Intelligent natural language question-answering in the area of psychology and psychiatry. Ask a simple question:
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